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7 Important Yarn Facts

There are 7 Important Yarn Facts that every knitter should understand

No matter how great your pattern is, or how skilled you are in your craft, yarn will always make or break your work. Yarn does matter, and telling the difference between one yarn and the next is essential for the quality of the finished product.

Here are 7 important yarn facts to keep in mind:

Fact #1: Read labels. All yarn comes with labels, letting you know about weight, composition, dye color and the like. There is a lot to learn from the fine print.

Fact #2: Weight actually means the diameter of the strand. It may sound counter-intuitive, but that’s yarn lingo for you! The heavier the yarn, the larger the strand.

Fact #3: Knit your own test swatches. Trying out a new type of yarn can be nerve-wrecking. Don’t let it get to you.  Knit a small patch and see how the yarn behaves. It will definitely save you a lot of trouble.

New Chroma Yarn Colors from Knit Picks

Fact #4: Make a gauge test before getting to work. Gauge is another knitting term that is used in pattern descriptions. It represents a number of rows and stitches. The pattern is practically split into gauges. Knit your own test sample before starting your project. Some people like knitting loosely, while others prefer tighter work.

Fact #5: Don’t replace yarn weight. Patterns are made to work with a certain type of yarn weight. Changing it may lead to unpleasant and unexpected results. Of course, if you’re daring enough, you can try it. Just don’t say you haven’t been warned!

Fact #6: Dye lot numbers matter. This little number is a bit of a troublemaker. Dyeing can lead to different results, even when using the same dye on different lots. It is just how things are. To avoid any out of tune coloring, just get skeins from the same dye lot.

Fact #7: Laundering instructions are there for a reason. Your knitted creations will last longer if you abide by these instructions.

Featured image(s): Sarah over at Knitting Women – thank you!

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