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10 Truths About Knitting And Why The Craft Is Now As Fashionable As Ever

Historian Takes A Look Back On Everything Knitting Means For Women Everywhere

The British women’s role in wartime is often overlooked. Historian Joyce Meader wants to change that by explaining in a book why knitting, an occupation that many women still embrace, played an important role in British history.

Another thing that the historian’s book points out is that knitting is back in fashion.

Here are 10 things about knitting you can learn for her book.

  1. Knitted items are a means for women to express their individuality. Displaying an item made by their own hands gives them proud and a sense of accomplishment.
  2. Knitting groups are all the rage right now and women love being able to meet and talk about their passions and the latest gossip.
  3. Wool shops are springing everywhere you go, so you would feel hard press not to find one wherever you go.
  4. Knitting is a way of giving something to the community. Case in point, many girls and women made beanie hats for soldiers in Afghanistan.
  5. Online knitting groups are bringing together people from all walks of life sharing the same passion. 7 million knitters are accounted for in the UK.
  6. British Wool Week has become quite a thing, and there are over 70 sheep breeds in the UK right now.
  7. A solider jumper made for Prince George has sparked a growing interest in knitting items in the country.
  8. British weather is known to be cold and wet. What better garments to protect yourself than something knitted!
  9. British supermodel Kate Moss and TV presenter Kirstie Allsopp are heavy promoters of the knitted style, so there is no wonder so many are taking after them.
  10. Knitting is something good for the mind, and many British women embrace this activity when there is something hanging on their minds.

If you are interested in purchasing Joyce’s interesting book, you can find it on Amazon: Knitskrieg: A Call to Yarns!: A History of Military Knitting from the 1800s to the Present Day

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